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SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 62  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 241-244

Identification of the force–velocity curve on dynamic resistance exercise for rats


1 Research in Exercise and Nutrition in Health and Sports Performance-PENSARE, Graduate Program in Movement Sciences, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Brazil
2 Graduate Program in Health and Development in the Midwest Region, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Brazil
3 Research in Exercise and Nutrition in Health and Sports Performance-PENSARE, Graduate Program in Movement Sciences; Graduate Program in Health and Development in the Midwest Region, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Brazil

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Hugo A. P. Santana
College of Education, Federal University of Mato Grosso Do Sul, Avenida Costa E Silva, S/N Zipcode 79070-900, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul
Brazil
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/CJP.CJP_49_19

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The aim of this study was to identify force–velocity and power–velocity curves in climbing activity protocols, used as dynamic resistance exercise in rats. Eighteen 45-day-old male Wistar rats (weight = 211.9 ± 5.2 g) were evaluated. After familiarization to the climbing procedure, the animals performed an incremental climbing test (load relative to 75% of the body mass at first stage, followed by 30 g increments with and 120 s recovery between climbs) to determine the maximum carrying capacity (MCC). After this, the animals climbed with different loads (without load, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 75%, 90%, and 100% of MCC) with 120 s recovery between climbs. Time for each climb was recorded to calculate the mechanical power. The peak power was reached at 30% of MCC. For the force–velocity curve, an inversely proportional relation was observed between force and velocity, as expected, greater forces were expressed in lower velocities. Therefore, our results suggest that training at 30% of MCC should be encouraged aiming the target for greater power output and 90%–100% of MCC should be the load aiming for strength training in climbing activities for rats.


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