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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 64  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 16-23

Vitamin C supplementation improves blood pressure and oxidative stress after acute exercise in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over study


1 Biomedical Sciences Program, Graduate School; Exercise and Sport Sciences Development and Research Group, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
2 Exercise and Sport Sciences Development and Research Group; Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
3 Exercise and Sport Sciences Development and Research Group, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen; Sports and Exercise Science Program, Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Nong Khai Campus, Nong Khai, Thailand
4 Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
5 Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories; Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Sciences, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
6 Exercise and Sport Sciences Development and Research Group; Graduate School, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Assoc. Prof. Naruemon Leelayuwat
Exercise and Sport Sciences Development and Research Group, Graduate School, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/cjp.cjp_95_20

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This study aimed to assess the effect of Vitamin C on blood pressure (BP), and subsequently on oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) release, following the low-intensity exercise in the patients. This study included 24 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) (age, 53 ± 7 years; hemoglobin A1c, 10.1% ± 0.9%) randomized into two 6-week daily arms based on the consumption of either placebo or 1000 mg Vitamin C. The crossover trial occurred after a 6-week washout. Before and after both supplementation arms, all patients performed cycling exercise at 33% of peak oxygen consumption for 20 min. BP was measured before, immediately, and 60 min after the exercise. Blood samples were drawn immediately before and after the exercise to determine plasma ascorbate, malondialdehyde (MDA), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), and NO concentrations. Data showed significant lower BP in the Vitamin C arm when compared with the placebo arm (systolic BP [SBP] P < 0.001 at every time point, diastolic BP [DBP] P < 0.001 except at immediately after exercise, P < 0.05). Plasma ascorbate concentration (P < 0.05 at every time point) and plasma NO (at resting P < 0.001, immediately after exercise P < 0.05) were significantly increased in the Vitamin C arm than in the placebo arm. Plasma MDA (P < 0.05 at every time point) and F2-IsoPs (P < 0.05 at every time point) concentrations were significantly lower in the Vitamin C arm than in the placebo arm. In addition, data showed significantly lower SBP (P < 0.001 at every time point), DBP (P < 0.001 except at immediately after exercise P < 0.05), plasma MDA (P < 0.001 at every time point), and F2-IsoPs (P < 0.05 at every time point) at post-supplementation than at pre-supplementation. Besides, there were significantly higher plasma ascorbate (P < 0.05 at every time point) and NO (at rest P < 0.01, immediately after exercise P < 0.05) concentrations at post-supplementation than at pre-supplementation. This is in contrast to the placebo treatment arm which demonstrated no statistical difference in all outcomes throughout the experiment. This study suggests that 6-week Vitamin C supplementation decreased preexercise and postexercise BPs, possibly due to improved oxidative stress and NO release. However, exercise had no effect on any outcome measures.


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